Gaming

Best Loot Crate Subscription Box Alternatives

Although Loot Crate started the trend of paying for a mystery box of themed merchandise, it is by no means the only such service on the market. This article seeks to highlight some of the other competitors and innovators in the “blind crate” industry.

1up

This is one of the more direct competitors to Loot Crate. Every 1Up Box is guaranteed to offer five to seven different items themed around one geeky subculture or theme.

Lootaku

Lootaku is a premium anime, gamer, and geek subscription box. Lootaku offers three subscription plans and you can also find past boxes on sale for up to 50% off!

With the detail and quality of the products in Lootaku boxes, you will not be disappointed.

Nerd Block

Although another competitor to Loot Crate, this one comes in several different flavors. When a user signs up for Nerd Block, they are given some control over the mysteries that will arrive at his door each month. These distinctions are:

  • Comic Block for comics materials.
  • Horror Block for horror content.
  • Classic Block which is the default, offering four to six different figures, toys and clothing.
  • Arcade Block for game-related content.
  • Junior Block for children ages 6 to 11. This category is further divided to account for whether the recipient favors toys for boys or for girls.

Comic Bento

Rather than load you down with a variety of tat from different geeky subcultures, Comic Bento is focused on providing its subscribers with comic books and graphic novels. Despite the different content, Comic Bento sticks to a theme for each of its boxes, like books that feature characters prominent in the Marvel Cinematic Universe or characters whose books have hit major milestones.

Wil Wheaton Quarterly Co.

The contents of this particular subscription service are all inspired by suggestions from the super geeky Wil Wheaton, famous for his role as child genius Wesley Crusher on “Star Trek: The Next Generation” and the host of Geek and Sundry’s “Tabletop” program, or sometimes the suggestions come from one of his many close friends within the various realms of geek culture.

Brick Loot

As the name might suggest to those in the know, Brick Loot is a LEGO-themed subscription service. Every box contains anywhere from four to eight different LEGO-related items.

Tokyo Treat

It is a well-known fact that many geeks have an affinity for the country of Japan; after all, Japan is the country where a large number of video games, tokusatsu shows and Godzilla call home. Every Tokyo Treat box contains a variety of sweet and savory Japanese snacks, all shipped with the Japanese appreciation for seasonal eats in mind.

BarkBox

Where most blind subscription-based merchandise services cater to humans, BarkBox is one of, if not the only, one with dog owners in mind. Every BarkBox comes with a variety of treats, toys and other items designed to bring a smile to your dog’s face.

Retro Game Treasure

Just like Tokyo Treat and BarkBox, this particular blind box is intended for a specific niche: the retro gamer. While signing up, you are asked to list what systems and titles you own. After listing your retro library’s contents, you are then asked about which particular game genres you prefer to play.

You will then receive several different games across multiple consoles related to the genres you favor; there is no risk of receiving five copies of a single “shovelware” title.

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