Business

How To Get Started With Office Branding

Businesses can benefit from incorporating consistent branding into their products, advertising, website and social media presence, yet many neglect one of the most important aspects of their company – the workplace. However, this is arguably the most important place to be ‘on message’ and establish a clear company culture.

Regardless of the nature of your business, it is likely that staff are going to spend a significant amount of time in the office building and it is quite likely you will also invite clients in. Through intelligent office branding, you can convey your values to both, while also projecting confidence and professionalism.

Here, we take a look at some tips to help you get started with branding your workplace.

1.Establish What Your Brand Is

While it may seem an obvious point, you cannot begin the branding process without having a clear idea what your brand is. Despite this, a surprising number of managers and business leaders struggle to clearly state what their company represents and cannot define the precise message they are trying to communicate.

A simple way to pinpoint your brand identity is to speak to the marketing department and go over current advertising campaigns, slogans, logos, fonts, etc. In addition, think about the way you would describe your business on the company website, on flyers, or when speaking to a client on the phone.

Would you use the word ‘fun’, ‘innovative’ or ‘traditional’? The descriptive words you use are the ideas that your company branding need to communicate to staff, clients, partners and passers-by.

 2.Consider Your Colour Scheme

One of the most important visual elements of your office space is the colour scheme you choose and while this decision can be informed by a number of factors, including pure aesthetic appeal and colour psychology, it should also be influenced by your brand identity. What are the colours associated with your brand, and why?

Again, it makes sense to work with your marketing department and think about what colours are used in your logo and in marketing campaigns. To provide an example, Google painted the rooms in their Dublin office to match the different colours on their logo and this simple technique constantly reminds staff who they work for and represent.

You can also think about the wider message you are trying to send. If you are a business dealing in technology, it may make sense to use a modern design, with futuristic metallic colours. On the other hand, if you promote your business’ green credentials, it might be wise to use the colour green, as well as other natural tones.

 3.Add Some Decorative Elements

Next, you need to start thinking about how you can use decorative elements to help align your office space with your company culture. For instance, on a very basic level, many companies choose to have their company logo featured prominently in reception areas so that it is one of the first things clients see.

However, you can go beyond this. If you utilise a particular font for your company logo or marketing literature, perhaps you can find ways to include this within the office space. Alternatively, you might opt to feature some of the products your company sells within office rooms, or put exceptional work produced by staff on the walls.

4.Take Branding to the Next Level

Truly exceptional workplace branding pays attention to the smallest of details and finds ways    to link the company to them. If your staff regularly use pens or pencils, why not invest in getting branded stationary? Similarly, if you are issuing paper or notepads, could you include the company logo at the top or on the cover?

“When you’re looking at your brand, the tiniest of things count,” says Lilli Hender, a marketing executive for Office Genie, writing for the website Fourth Source. “From the notebooks on the desks to the tea in the cupboard, these items can speak volumes about your business.”

Finally, consider whether the message you send staff aligns with the message you are sending customers. If your company is presented as highly professional, you probably don’t want staff in casual clothes, sitting on beanbags, and if your business is based on health, it may make sense to remove vending machines filled with chocolate bars.

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Reno Macri is Director of Enigma Visual Solutions, a UK based exhibition and event company. It specialises in visual branding, event design & production, graphic productions, signage systems, experiential marketing, exhibition stands design, interiors and more. He enjoys sharing his thoughts on upcoming marketing ideas and design trends.

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